Monticello Thomas Jefferson

History is simply fascinating to me, especially when it is tied to chocolate! American Heritage Chocolate is taking 3 bloggers on a journey of a lifetime, through the history of chocolate in America. Our first stop was in Charlottesville, Virginia at the Thomas Jefferson, Monticello where the annual Heritage Harvest Festival was happening.

Harvest Festival Monticello

The night before the Harvest Festival is the chef’s dinner which features some of the area’s finest cuisine overlooking the breath-taking grounds. The fiesta has started and even though the weather was a bit touch-and-go, the festival went on without a hitch!

2014-09-13 10.45.38

Rain or shine, I was ready to learn my chocolate history.

20140913_094849

The first tent I noticed when I arrived at the grounds was the American Heritage chocolate tent! Here we learned how the American Chocolate is created just as they did back when Jefferson wrote about the chocolate drink.

Chocolate Making Process

The cocoa pod & grows off the trunk of a tree. The cocoa pod can be harvested year-round. The act of roasting, grinding and sorting the cocoa nuts can take all day. The small metal pan under the grinding stone takes a complete day to fill. The 8 spices shown are the original 8 used which allows the American Heritage brand to be authenticated as the chocolate made in the colonial times. Chocolate truly did begin its history in America, not in Europe as many may believe. Check out more tweets about the @Choc_History drink at #americanheritagechocolate.


Monticello Gardens


We were allowed to take photographs inside the Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s home. I compiled a short video featuring all of the images I took on the private tour. Here are some more fun facts I learned on the tour.

Thomas Jefferson's Home

ah-chocolates_500x300 (1)Make sure to follow American Heritage on their social media channels to follow along the bloggers on their journey to discover America’s chocolate history on TwitterFacebook, and Pinterest. This blog post is part of a paid SocialMoms and American Heritage blogging program. The opinions and ideas expressed here are my own.